Local ‘flower farmer’ blooms spirit of gratitude

Updated: Apr 14


Katie Stutler, owner of Sage Moose Flower Farm.

By SARA VANDEN BERGE

Erath County resident Katie Stutler describes herself as a “flower farmer” and has turned her passion for beauty into a blooming business.


Literally.


Stutler owns Sage Moose Flower Farm, a six-acre patch of land she lives on with her husband Mark and their three children. It’s also the place where she grows cut flowers.


Lots of them.


“I grow flowers to cut and sell,” she said. “Cut flowers are anything you would put in a vase or inside your home.”


Stutler grew up in Fort Worth and attended Abilene Christian University where she earned a degree in biology.


“I wanted to study landscape architecture, but they didn’t have that degree plan so I went pre-med,” she said.


Stutler’s love of foliage and her creativity has even led her to do some landscaping for friends.


But it was a book she read a few years ago that sprouted a new career path.


“I read a book from Floret Farms in Washington State about farming and growing cut flowers,” she said. “That is when I decided that this is what I want to do.”


Stutler took an online course from Floret Farms and a few years ago launched Sage Moose.

She is now in her second season of growing flowers.


“What I have in bloom right now are ranunculus, anemone, daffodils and some tulips,” she said. “I tried tulips for the first time this year and they actually grew very well. I will be growing more next year.”


She is currently planting things that will bloom this summer like zinnias, cosmos, lisianthus and sunflowers.


“I also grow a lot of herbs like mint and basil that I use for greenery,” she said.


A market bouquet Stutler sells weekly.

SPREADING HER BEAUTY

Each week, Stutler sells a market bouquet for $15 on her website www.sagemoose.com.


“Every Thursday I take the bouquets to Beans and Franks 2 and orders can be picked up there,” she said. “It’s worked well with our current situation. People can pay me online and walk in and get their bouquets and there is no contact.”


Stutler has also partnered with Lindi Hanna, owner of Annie’s Therapeutic Companions, to deliver bouquets to area nursing homes.


“So far we have been able to give over 675 flowers to our nursing homes,” Stutler said. “For every 10 bouquets I sell, I donate a bucket of flowers, which has between 50 to 60 flowers in it.”


She said locals have donated to the cause to ensure the city’s elderly continue to receive the flowers.


“It’s been a great community effort,” she said.

Sage Moose Flower Farm specializes in cut flowers.

‘GRATITUDE IS CONTAGIOUS’

Stutler’s optimism during this dark time is inspiring – and she is focusing on nature’s beauty to keep a positive attitude.


“I think it’s important for people to slow down and notice the details, and I think flowers are the perfect way to do that because each one is so unique,” she said.


“We use flowers to celebrate and we use them on our worst of days. They are a good way to love people and encourage people.

“That spirit of gratitude is contagious.”

Need flowers? You can reach Stutler on her website or message her on Instagram.

Photos courtesy Sage Moose Flower Farm.

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Beneath the Surface News. sara@beneaththesurfacenews.com